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Home | Tip of the Week | Homemade Tube Quiver
 
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Homemade Tube Quiver

By Deed Cimperman
Printer-Friendly Format

I have made many quivers of different designs over the years. Most have worked--some better than others--and some were not worth the time, materials, and effort of construction. In my opinion, this quiver is the best because it is inexpensive, easy to build, and works well. Many aspects of this quiver are custom built according to the user's needs.

Materials:

  • One 36" piece of 3 inch (internal diameter) thin-wall PVC pipe
  • 8' of 1" wide nylon strap
  • Two 1" plastic buckles
  • One 4"x4"x 1" piece of closed cell foam
  • A discarded 5 gallon plastic bucket lid

Let's take a look at the photos.

<div align=center>The tube should be long enough for the arrow to be pushed a few inches up the tube before removal, but still contained in the covered tube. </div>
The tube should be long enough for the arrow to be pushed a few inches up the tube before removal, but still contained in the covered tube.

<div align=center>Cut the elongated hole about 12" to 14" long in order to easily remove the arrows. I cut the round ends using a Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel attached. For the long sides I simply use a hacksaw blade to get a straight line.</div>
Cut the elongated hole about 12" to 14" long in order to easily remove the arrows. I cut the round ends using a Dremel tool with a cut-off wheel attached. For the long sides I simply use a hacksaw blade to get a straight line.

<div align=center>The bottom is made from the bucket lid, cut to size with tin snips. Then cut the foam a little larger than the inside bottom diameter so that it is compressed into the bottom and holds the points.</div>
The bottom is made from the bucket lid, cut to size with tin snips. Then cut the foam a little larger than the inside bottom diameter so that it is compressed into the bottom and holds the points.

<div align=center>The lip needs to be high enough to cover the arrowhead, especially for broadheads.</div>
The lip needs to be high enough to cover the arrowhead, especially for broadheads.

<div align=center>The open end can be covered with a removable cover to protect the arrows from the elements.</div>
The open end can be covered with a removable cover to protect the arrows from the elements.

<div align=center>In use, the quiver rests diagonally across the back with the bottom near the right rear jean pocket (for a right handed archer) so when the hand is at rest, it is at the bottom of the quiver, ready to remove an arrow.  As an arrow is removed from the quiver, movement can't be seen from the front, because the arrow slides down behind the right leg of the shooter.</div>
In use, the quiver rests diagonally across the back with the bottom near the right rear jean pocket (for a right handed archer) so when the hand is at rest, it is at the bottom of the quiver, ready to remove an arrow. As an arrow is removed from the quiver, movement can't be seen from the front, because the arrow slides down behind the right leg of the shooter.

How it Works:
Put arrows in through the top opening, points down, and push them into the recessed foam. To remove an arrow, reach into the elongated opening, push the arrow back up the tube far enough to clear the 1" lip. Pull the arrow down and out of the tube and let it slide through your hand. Catch the arrow just below the fletching and put it on the bowstring.

This quiver is quite efficient, and with practice it can be used without taking your eyes off your quarry. The quiver can be covered with cloth, painted or camouflaged using permanent markers--be creative. To reduce the weight you can drill (or cut) as many holes as you would like. If you have any questions or comments, please contact me at sandeed44@verizon.net.

"If it is to be, it is up to me."

Please see the follow-up to this tip: Tube Quiver--The Rest of the Story.



·  Tube Quiver...The Rest of the Story


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